Thursday, April 09, 2009

Har Kow, Siew Mai

I love Dim Sum. Talking about it makes me realised that we haven't been to one for a long time. Don't ask me why, but somehow we are always so busy on a weekend with other activities.

We loved this particular restaurant in Chinatown which has been serving dim sum since I was a little kid and they still do. The ambience is totally different from those you found in the main shopping belt. The spacious and huge dinning hall and the crowd is pretty comparable to Hong Kong ones and I LOVE Hong Kong dim sum for their vast varieties and good qualities.

Well, we don't have time for dim sum session this weekend and we definitely can't fly to Hong Kong for dim sum. So let's have some right at home.

My two all time favourites are Char Siew Pau and Har Kow.

Yes, I have to try making pau again. My last experience didn't yield the standard that I wanted. Thus I went back to the drawing board. This time round, the dough isn't that sticky and wrapping is much easier. Though my family said it tasted just like those commercial ones but I still think I need to work on it some more.

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I also attempted another recipe that I found here.

The texture is pretty good but somehow, mine like the blogger also yield brownish spots. Though I read how she overcome her problem but I guess I didn't knead that long enough to distribute the baking powder solution. Anyway, my baking powder solution was more paste like than liquid. Well, more experience needed.

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I have read that ammonia is all part of pau making. It is supposed to make it soft. To get rid of the strong and pungent smell, vendors kept their pau steaming for hours.

Of course I am not going to do that, if not my gas bills will be rocket high. I resorted to making them hours before I served so that I can re-steam it again.

What you need for the pau skin:
Makes: 18~20 petite buns


(A)
4 g instant yeast
70 g warm water

(B)
140 g cake flour - 低筋面粉
60 g wheat starch - 澄面粉- normally used for cai kuih skin
60 g sugar
20 g oil

(C)
7 g baking powder
10 g water

Method:

Mix yeast in warm water.

Sieve cake flour and wheat starch together. Slowly add in the yeast water into ingredient (B) and knead to mix well, this will take about 20mins.

Let the dough rest for 90 minutes. The dough will be a bit dry at this stage.

There will be another 10g water to be added in (C)

After 90 minutes, mix the dough with baking powder mix in 10g water.

Slowly pour the baking powder mixture into the rested dough and knead the dough to mix well.

Rest for another 20 minutes.

Divide the dough into 25g balls (for petite size bun).

Dust your working surface, hands and rolling pin with some flour.

Roll the ball to a 1.5" diameter skin (the middle should be thinner than the edge).

Spoon the BBQ pork mixture in the middle of the skin, fold and seal with your fingers. Do not let the fillings touch on the edge as this will make your buns not cracked/smiled.

Steam at high heat for 10 minutes (petite size), 12~15 minutes for bigger size baos.

I simply adores Har Kow too. This is one that I will never pass when having dim sum. To determine whether the restaurant is giving good quality food, I usually judge by their prawns. I love the texture of the chewy skin and the crunchiness of the sweet prawns. Then again, there are some who soak the prawns in soda to give them that crunch and I wonder what makes them think that the customer won't taste it. duh.

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This time, I have a hard time pleating the Har Kow. It is much harder to pleat than my Ku Chye Kueh the last time.

Guess I will have to use the same dough recipe as that one. At least, these satisfy me for the time being till my next Dim Sum session and God knows when.
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11 comments:

  1. Hi..I drop by to see yr "Char Siu Bao" That was what my bao's look like when I first make it, I think you've not knead it long enough and you still need more practice on how to fold and seal the baos.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The pau i made before looked like your brown pau.

    Your har kau must be yummy, and I think the pleating looks ok as well.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi E, I have an award on my blog for you to claim. Hop on by!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Tintin, you are absolutely right about my fold and sealing. I am totally bad at it. Must do more and hopefully family won't get sick of baos. hahaha

    Piggy, yah according to tintin, not enough kneading. Then again, I have read that too much kneading also don't work for pau making. Guess we have to do trial and error.

    Rei, thaks for the award. Hoping over.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I found your blog thru Rei. I love dim sum and I'm really amazed that you made your own ... they look so delicious ^o^

    ReplyDelete
  6. Making Dim Sum is a territory which I dare not cross over for now, because I am lack of patience & skills. Haha! You have some nice ones here! ;)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks Noobcook, you have a beautiful blog.

    Homeladychef, I still have lots to learn. hopefully one day, I can reach restaurant standard.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Wow your baos look just like in the restaurant! How long approx do you knead the dough for? Can you use this bao recipe to make lai wong bao (custard buns)?

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thanks Noobcook, you have a beautiful blog.

    Homeladychef, I still have lots to learn. hopefully one day, I can reach restaurant standard.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi..I drop by to see yr "Char Siu Bao" That was what my bao's look like when I first make it, I think you've not knead it long enough and you still need more practice on how to fold and seal the baos.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Wow your baos look just like in the restaurant! How long approx do you knead the dough for? Can you use this bao recipe to make lai wong bao (custard buns)?

    ReplyDelete

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