Monday, March 23, 2009

Simply cannot give up

After my two last blunders, I am determined to complete my char siew pau trial. The filling has been sitting in the freezer and I really don't want to delay too long. I am curious whether I can really do it too. Perhaps thinking about my kids' love for char siew pau spurs me.

So last night, I went about with the starter dough. Making sure I got the right flour and right time this round. hahahaha.

I needed to be up early to do this trial as my kids are starting their new school term today. So time management must be precise. I timed my starter dough so that it is actually 12 hours to start the process the next day. It was good, because by the time I have completed it with steaming.

I just hit 8:30am! Just in time for my breakfast. hahaha I noticed that my starter dough didn't balloon like as when I was using bread flour. Thus I am unable to tell whether it was a success.

I find that the dough after mixing in the starter dough was a little too dry. I actually added a little more water to it so that it can form a ball. Rolling and filling was really easy. I have no problem.

I based on 40g dough and 20g filling.

I will definitely need to increase it to 30 - 35g next round.

I used an electric steamer, thus I wasn't able to control the heat. Perhaps next round, I will use a wok to steam. I don't know whether it is because of this reason.

The first 6-10 mins of my pau fluff up prettily as you are able to see the pleats. After the 11 - 15mins, my pau's pleats disappeared.

Now it looks like tau sar pau instead. :( I am not sure whether reducing the ammonia will affect the quality of the pau but it definitely didn't give up a nice aroma to the pau. In fact, you have to overcome the pungent first sniff to sink your teeth to the steaming hot bun. Only then, you are able to enjoy it.

Personally I find that the texture of the skin is not what I am looking for. Though it doesn't really stick to your teeth, it has that a little tad too dry feel. I like my concoction of my fillings though. Not too sweet and not too sticky.

I am already eyeing on another recipe found in Jo Deli. Let's see when I will feel adventurous again.

These buns sure didn't come easy. hahahaha Note: A day old pau:

After reheating in a microwave with a cup of water inside. The texture of the pau remains same as freshly done ones (soft but still dry feel).

I noticed that the smell of ammonia become less noticeable.

Photobucket

Pau Skin Recipe extracted from My Home Kitchen.

What you need:
Starter Dough:

110g tap water
185g Hong kong flour
1/2 tsp Double Acting Baking Powder (I used Dove Brand)
1/8 tsp instant yeast

Mix everything together in a bowl. Cover with a hot damp towel and let it proof inside oven with no power turned on.

Skin dough:

375g Hong kong flour
200g sugar 23g shortening
75g tap water (might need to increase the amount as I couldn't get a ball stage)
20g double acting baking powder
5g ammonia (I will research and see whether I can reduce this amount)
1/2 tsp vinegar (I used distilled vingegar)

Add all the above ingredients to the starter dough. Using a dough hook, mix on speed 3 for 6 minutes. (Mix till the dough is not sticky and form a ball.)

Take out dough and scale to 40g each. (with 35g of fillings)

Shape each piece into a ball before rolling.

Fill with chilled meat filling and steam immediately at high heat for 10 mins)

Note:

1. Maximum proving time for starter dough is 14 hours. Over fermenting will make your baos sour.

2. This recipe will yield 30 buns if you scaled to 30g each.

3. When rolling dough, keep the edges thinner and the centre portion slightly thicker.

4. For char siew baos, steam for 10 minutes.

5. For baos with raw meat fillings, steam for 15 minutes.

6. If making big chicken/meat baos, steam for 20 minutes.

7. Prepare the fillings after you have made the starter dough and leave it in the fridge. (Chilled fillings is easier to handle.)

For the fillings
What you need:


600g lean char siew, diced small
5 shallots, diced finely
2 tbsp white sesame seeds (optional)

Seasonings:

60ml water
1 tsp oyster sauce
1 tsp dark soy sauce
1 tsp sesame oil 1 tssp sugar
1 tbsp corn flour

Method:

Heat wok with a little oil, sautee onions till soft.

Add in seasoning and stir till it becomes thick.

Add in char siew and mix till it is well coated with seasoning.

Mix in sesame seeds and remove.
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16 comments:

  1. Ooh..your pau looks lovely, makes me feel like going for dim sum.

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  2. E, they still look great to me. Does the skin still stay soft when cold? I'm eyeing the 3 day pau skin but still couldn't find time to do it.

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  3. Edith, I remember trying pau twice or so last year. Also didn't make it. *shrugged* So I concluded they're just not for me. Same as you, I totally dislike the pungent smell of Amonia, even hubby could detect it. I haven't got the guts to try them again this year....lol... Good luck to you!

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  4. Hello

    I am a frequent reader of ur blog, just would like to share my experience of making pau with u.

    Like u, I tried the pau skin recipe from My Home Kitchen (2 times), however, I did not get the desired texture.

    Then I tried the pau skin recipe from here
    http://jodeli.proboards22.com/index.cgi?board=chinese&action=print&thread=214

    I was very pleased with the results. It did not have the stick to the teeth feel and best of all its soft even when it is cold.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thanks Nicole, I am actually eyeing on that recipe too. Glad that you found success with it. Do you have a blog?

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  6. don t give up. These look nice though :)

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  7. your pao looks very very good to me, now i crave for char siew pao... ;-)

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  8. Edith, if you can, get the VCD by Agnes Chang on pau making. Very very detailed explanation and she tells all. No secrets. I finally got mine right after watching her VCD.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Chicchicbaby, me too. Haven't have a decent dim sum session for a long time.

    Rei, 3 day pau ... long time leh. You try and let me know.

    KWF, Go for it. When comes to baking, I guess we cannot give up too easily. Jia You.

    Piggy, try it. But of course no char siew. hahahaha.. chicken will be nice too.

    Snooky Doodle: Thanks.

    Gina, Thanks. I will check that out. I guess it has to do with my wrapping?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi,
    I tried your recipe and I reduced the amount of ammonia but the pau turns out to be yellowish. How come yours are so white? Maybe the ammonia has to be that much like yours. Thanks for the recipe and keep up the good job of sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Airenchan, Could it be the flour? I used a pau flour (chinese brand) that I got from the wet market.

    ReplyDelete
  12. edith, all the whys like why use ammonia powder, pau flour etc are explain in the VCD. Not just show u how to wrap. The VCD also teaches the 1 day Pau dough, along with the 3 day pau dough. If I remembered correctly, the VCD teaches 5 recipes. Including the baked pau.

    ReplyDelete
  13. your pao looks very very good to me, now i crave for char siew pao... ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Airenchan, Could it be the flour? I used a pau flour (chinese brand) that I got from the wet market.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Ooh..your pau looks lovely, makes me feel like going for dim sum.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hi,
    I tried your recipe and I reduced the amount of ammonia but the pau turns out to be yellowish. How come yours are so white? Maybe the ammonia has to be that much like yours. Thanks for the recipe and keep up the good job of sharing.

    ReplyDelete

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